Harold Berglund, still life painter, goals

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PICTURES

BIOGRAPHY

GOALS

ON SEEING

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ON CEZANNE

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HISTORY

 

 

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Spilt apples 2005

WHAT I SEEK IN PAINTING

The still-life is a laboratory for research into our way of seeing and interpreting reality. I concentrate on the play of light on surfaces, around objects, in reflections and shadows. Transparent paints make for glowing colors and color mixing on a palette of the primary colors - red, yellow and blue - produces a full range of nuances. Each nuance painted separately so they stand distinct from one another. In a successful painting, light becomes color and color is light. What you see (all you ever see!) is light, an intense, multifaceted, unsubstantial light.

February 2007

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Apple, cup and plate 2009

WITH COLOR, LIGHT AND SHADOW, SEIZE REALITY!

During the last few years in my work with still life painting, I have sought to develop methods to capture the capricious, unpredictable, changeable in my perception of a still life. The objects do not change from day to day. The light shifts as it has always done. But I myself am different every day and therefore my impression and interpretation of the still life changes. To bring out this variability, I try to start each day with a different approach. I change brushes, use of paint, work on different parts of the canvas, follow moments of inspiration. The paintings get a more variable surface and new dimensions. This exhibition has been my most demanding but also the most inspiring for future work

November 2010

Exhibit video

 

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Duck Pond 5  2011

MY NEW LANDSCAPES 2011 - 2012

After many years of developing my approach to still-life painting where I present every color nuance as an individual, distinct patch in a tight, organic structure, I turned my attention to landscape images attempting a technique similar to my still-life work, that is, a palette of the primary colors (red, blue, and yellow) and white and the use of a variety of transparent and opaque patches of color. In the landscapes my still-life style shows in the occasional structured parts but elsewhere there’s a looser approach. I find it a challenging and exciting way to paint. As with my still-life paintings these landscapes raise questions of what is it you actually see and how this visual input can be presented in oil-painting.

November 2012